In the Student Spotlight: Aug. 9, 2019

Kudos to these students

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  • Mark McAndrews, a doctoral student in applied linguistics, won The Language Learning Dissertation grant, which supports the dissertation research of doctoral candidates in the language sciences. This grant program is competitive both in the U.S. and abroad and will help McAndrews carry out research for his dissertation, titled “Prosody Instruction for ESL Listening Comprehension.”
  • Recent alumnus Nathaniel Levy (B.S. Accountancy ’17; MBA ’18) earned the 2018 Elijah Watt Sells Award for obtaining a cumulative average score over 95.5 across all four sections of the CPA Exam on the first attempt. Of the nearly 86,000 individuals who sat for the exam in 2018, only 110 candidates met the criteria.
  • Senior quarterback Case Cookus and junior punter DJ Arnson were named on preseason awards watch lists. Cookus was selected for the 25-player watch list for the 2019 Walter Payton Award, which is presented to the offensive player of the year in NCAA FCS Football. Arnson is on the watch list for the inaugural FCS Punter of the Year Award with 27 other players.
  • Twelve Lumberjacks made the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association’s 2019 All-Academic Awards, recognizing outstanding athletic and academic performances. Maggie Carruth, Helena McLeod, Jasmine Malone, Pipi Eitel, Geordie Beamish, Cade Burks, Tyler Day, Brodey Hasty, Parker Joens, Jacob Kaufman, Theo Quax and Ryan Raff earned academic honors.
  • Bioengineering doctoral student Mostafa Mahmoudi, under the supervision of Amir Arzani, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, presented a podium talk at the U.S. National Congress on Computational Mechanics at the end of July in Austin. The talk is titled “Near-wall biological transport processes in coronary artery atherosclerosis.” Arzani also was invited by the Computational Multiphysics Modeling of Cardiovascular Systems mini-symposium organizers to present at the conference.
  • Chemistry and biochemistry students Erin Carter and Alexanndra Heyert, along with applied physics and materials science professor Gerrick Lindberg and collaborators have published a paper in the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics showing that ionic liquid-based materials can cause the protein FlgM to take on biologically-relevant structures in solution.