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NAU’s #FLGTreeTag project raises awareness about varied benefits of trees

Tree-Tag

Graduate student Laurel Westendorf models the tree tags that will go up on North Quad next week.

Trent DeBeare, a forestry graduate student and member of NAU’s Tree Campus Advisory Committee, is excited about the project.

“NAU already has such a well-regarded forestry tradition,” he said. “The Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation represents the next chapter in that tradition, and the Tree City designation shows that the Flagstaff community appreciates the role forestry plays in shaping our culture and environmental stewardship.”

In addition to purifying the air and water, trees provide valuable wildlife habitat, sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and provide important human health benefits that include reducing stress and increasing creativity.

“These types of projects are great opportunities to enhance the public’s understanding of the many benefits natural resources provide to our community,” said Betsy Emery, open space specialist with the City of Flagstaff. “Flagstaff is surrounded by incredible natural landscapes, but our quality of life also is greatly enhanced by the natural resources available within our city limits, including our urban trees.”

For more details and updates about the project, follow FlagstaffOpenSpace and GreenNAU on Facebook. The Flagstaff community is encouraged to get involved by tagging photos on social media with #FLGTreeTag.

2 Responses to NAU’s #FLGTreeTag project raises awareness about varied benefits of trees

  1. nuriz

    may i know who wrote this article?

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