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Blog Archives

Measuring tree height.

Unlocking the mysteries of plant root function, from Alaska to South Africa

Studies have measured root biomass and root profiles, but very few look at the function of those roots. Continue reading

soil fungi

NAU’s Hungate co-authors research report published in ‘Science’

Research helps resolve a long-standing debate about the role of nitrogen limitation for plant responses to carbon dioxide. Continue reading

Oak Creek

Do the leaves that fall into a stream affect the insects that fly out?

Study reveals new ways a plant’s genotype can influence its surrounding ecosystem. Continue reading

diagram

New tool reveals role of ancestry in soil communities of bacteria

Quantitative stable isotope probing opens new insights to intact soil communities of bacteria. Continue reading

Invasive Japanese beetle

We’ve got your number: Tracing the source of invasive Japanese beetles

New technique can lead to more informed decisions about how to control the invasive pest. Continue reading

Latest Site Activity

Cheng-forum ‘More dreams made possible’—President Cheng discusses NAU’s success, goals at Campus Forum
President Cheng highlighted research, mentoring and the work of faculty and staff in helping NAU's student population succeed in and out of the classroom.
Sedona book NAU Bookstore hosts book-signing event for alumna during Homecoming week
Author and NAU alumna Lisa Schnebly Heidinger tells the story of her ancestor, Sedona Arabella Miller Schnebly, and how Sedona got its name.
For National Day of Writing, NAU professor talks about writing her ‘big, crazy, complicated book’
Journalism faculty Annette McGivney started researching a brutal murder a decade ago. The more she learned, the more she and the book changed.
2016 homecoming parade Homecoming 2017: Home is where the Lumberjacks are
From the dedicatee banquet and traditions day to the alumni breakfast and homecoming parade, here is your guide to the week's events leading up to the big Homecoming gold-out football game.
Alamosaurus Dinosaur NAU researcher Christopher Doughty discovers dinosaur dung fertilizes planet
According to Doughty, large animals are important not for the quantity of dung they produce, but for their ability to move long distances across landscapes, effectively mixing the nutrients. But as today’s large animal populations dwindle, the environment too is at risk.

Editor’s Picks

NAU’s unique study abroad program wins international award
NAU was honored for its Interdisciplinary Global Program, which allows students to study and work in another country for a full year, helping them to prepare for work in the global economy.
Patient with autism spectrum disorder NAU researcher discovers key to fighting autism may lie not in the mind, but in the gut
Greg Caporaso and team performed fecal microbial transplants, which showed promising results that could lead to a new treatment option.
NAU student-athletes and Louie the Lumberjack join Flagstaff area elementary school students at an assembly. Lumberjack love: NAU student-athletes work with area elementary school children
Members of several NAU sports teams worked with local elementary school students to encourage academic responsibility, good character and fitness through the Lumberjacks C.A.R.E. program